Yukon Territory

Alaska Highway - Beaver Creek YT to Delta AK

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Beaver Creek - historical mile 1202

My hometown is the most westerly community in Canada. It is also where construction crews made the final connection of the Alaska Highway on October 28, 1942. 

Beaver Creek, Yukon
Beaver Creek - September 1993

Beaver Creek Tourist Information Centre on Alaska Highway in Yukon
Tourist Information Centre in Beaver Creek - August 2010

Beaver Creek, Yukon
Aerial view of Beaver Creek - September 1986

The two-room, eight-grade school I attended is the building with the blue roof on the right. 
Canada Customs was located in front of the three white houses lined up on the left.

Beaver Creek Yukon in Winter
"Main Street" Beaver Creek - view southbound on the Alaska Highway - December 1998

The Canada Customs port of entry is located a mile north of town, near the Beaver Creek airport. 

Canada Customs
Northbound through the Canada customs facility north of Beaver Creek - March 2014

This airfield was cut out of the bush by my Dad in the early 1960s so he could enjoy his love for flying.  The airport has since been expanded and is now operated by the Yukon government.

Beaver Creek airport, Yukon
View of Canada Customs and Stalberg Airfield from Red Hill, just north of Beaver Creek - June 2008

The community dedicated the airport to my dad, Jack Stalberg, and erected a monument in his honour. In 2016, Jack Stalberg was awarded Yukon's Polaris Award at the Yukon Transportation Museum, acknowledging his work constructing the airport in the 1960s.

 Monument at Stalberg Airfield, Yukon
Monument at the airport near Beaver Creek, dedicated to my father Jack Stalberg - June 2008

Words on Jack Stalberg Monument, Beaver Creek Yukon
Text on the monument, dedicating the airport to my Dad, Jack Stalberg - June 2008

Alaska Highway
View west of the Alaska Highway between Beaver Creek and the border - August 2010

AK Hwy
View west of Alaska Highway between Beaver Creek and the Alaska Border - June 2008

Yukon/Alaska Border - historical milepost 1221

The signs at the Yukon/Alaska border have changed over the years, from rustic to more grand.  I liked the sign shown below and think it unfortunate that it is gone now.

Alaska Facts sign at Alaska Yukon border
Sign at the Yukon/Alaska border - September 1986

Picture - Yukon/Alaska border
Sign at the Yukon/Alaska border - September 1986

In 2010 the signs had changed.

Yukon border at Alaska on Alaska Highway
Signs as travellers cross into Yukon at the border - August 2010

Alaska-Yukon border
Doesn't look too much different in March 2014

Alaska / Yukon border in the 1950s
And vintage photo at the border looking into Yukon - mid 1950s with our family car

Going the other way, into Alaska, the signs have changed over the years too.
This rustic sign is no longer there ...

Welcome to Alaska sign at border on Alaska Highway
Sign at the Yukon/Alaska border - September 1993

The Alaska sign in 2010...

Welcome to Alaska sign on the Alaska Highway
On the Alaska Highway ready to enter Alaska - August 2010

Alaska sign
Welcome to Alaska - March 2014

Sign at Yukon Alaska border on Alaska Highway
In 2010, these temporary signs also greeted visitors to Alaska - August 2010

Port Alcan
Southbound at Port Alcan - customs building - September 2012

In 2010 we camped at the recreation site/campground at Deadman Lake.  The location is beautiful.  The campsites are rustic and not well-suited to RVs longer than 40'.

Deadman Lake campground on Alaska Highway
View from Deadman Lake campground towards the Wrangell Mountains - August 2010

Junction of Alaska Highway & Taylor Highway in Alaska
Junction of the Taylor Highway which leads to Dawson City in the Yukon - August 2010

Tetlin Junction
Tetlin Junction - March 2014

Tanana River
Tanana River approaching Tok - March 2014

Tok is Mile 1313 on the Alaska Highway. Possibly not the place of superstitious people to live!

Tok AK
Driving into Tok northbound - March 2014

Delta Junction - End of the Alaska Highway sign, Alaska
The END of the Alaska Highway at Delta Junction, ALASKA - September 2010

Delta Junction, Alaska -- Historical Mile 1422 --  is officially the end of the Alaska Highway.  The asphalt continues towards Fairbanks as the Richardson Highway.  Fairbanks had its own sign in 1986 - this sign might not be there now.

Fairbanks sign, Alaska
Sign at Fairbanks, Alaska - September 1986